A SoundCloud Fellowship project curating educational content on sound. Share your lessons, advice and tips using the DropBox button below.

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Sound School has come to an end! It has been a great journey and for the finale we gathered at Google Campus, London, to celebrate music, technology, and education. The event was an official partner to Internet Week Europe.

The evening began with a workshop from Roland Taylor from the English National Opera community choir. We learned a contemporary piece called Sound Without Words by composer Stephen Montague. It was a huge amount of fun and involved lots of strange sounds. Have a listen to the piece here:

We then moved on to the panel discussion on how advances in technology affect music education. We talked about the differences between online and offline learning and explored the implications of various kinds of technology for learning. We talked about how the social context of learning is important, and how different learners/users require unique things. One point became very clear - online resources vary in quality, but so do teachers in real life. Online tutorials can be great teaching aides, uniting teachers and learners across geographical distances, and mostly for free. Additionally, the way that quality control online is crowd-sourced means that it is easy to pin point quality from the rest.

Listen to the full panel discussion for further insight on this fascinating topic:

Panelists were: Evangelos Himonides, Senior Lecturer in Technology, Education, and Music at the Institute of Education; Roland Taylor, formerly Director of Digital and Participation at the English National Opera and Interactive Editor at the BBC; Jennie Henley, Lecturer in Music Education at the Institute of Education; and Tim Murray Browne, interactive sound artist and researcher.

Many thanks to the panelists and audience for a fun and stimulating evening! Thanks to SoundCloud for the t-shirts and to sharypic.com for the live PhotoWall.

Sound School at Campus, Friday 16th November, 7pm

To mark the culmination of Sound School, a SoundCloud fellowship project, there will be a discussion on tech and music education at Campus London (powered by Google) this Friday, 16th November at 7pm. The event is an official partner of Internet Week Europe, a festival celebrating Europe’s dynamic and vibrant internet industry. 

The discussion will tackle the way that new technology, particularly the web, is changing the face of music education. It will be lead by the following panelists: Evangelos Himonides (chair), Senior Lecturer in Technology, Education, and Music at the Institute of Education; Roland Taylor, formerly Director of Digital and Participation at the English National Opera and Interactive Editor at the BBC; Jennie Henley, Lecturer in Music Education at the Institute of Education; Elaine Chew, Professor of Digital Media and Director of Music Initiatives at Queen Mary, University of London; and Tim Murray Browne, interactive sound artist and researcher.

Before the panel there will be a singing workshop lead by Roland from the English National Opera community choir.

Schedule:

  • 7pm - An opportunity for SoundClouders to share knowledge and love of sound. If you have a specific skill you want to teach, or something you desperately want to learn about, share it on the Facebook event page. The first half an hour will be dedicated to mingling and connecting over sound education.
  • 7.30pm - A group singing workshop! Bring your enthusiasm and best singing voice along!
  • 8.15pm - Discussion begins. A live twitter wall, provided by sharypic, will display comments from the audience as the discussion progresses. This means you can have your say, going beyond a typical 10 minute audience q&a session, without disrupting the flow of the panel.


Share photos from your phone with the tag #scss2012 and they will appear on a live sharypic PhotoWall.

SoundCloud goodies up for grabs, first come first served!

RSVP by joining the Facebook event page. Admittance will only be via the guest list, so don’t forget to sign up!
Address: 3rd Floor, Campus, 4-5 Bonhill Street, London EC2A 4BX. Google Map

More info on the panelists:

  • Evangelos Himonides (chair) holds the University of London’s first ever ‘lecturer in music technology education’ position. He teaches Music Education, Music Technology and Information Technology, at a post-graduate level, at the Institute of Education, University of London. As a musician, technologist and educator, Evangelos has had an ongoing career in experimental research in the fields of psychoacoustics, music perception, music cognition, information technology, human-computer interaction, special needs, the singing voice and singing development. His special interests include interactive educational multimedia, multiple modalities and channels in virtual education.
  • Roland Taylor has worked as a teacher, social worker, broadcaster, events producer, project manager, digital editor and producer, educator, musician and composer. At English National Opera he focused upon Digital and Participation work (as Director), recently staging John Cage’s Musicircus which received critical acclaim in the national press. At the BBC Roland was Interactive Editor of the BBC Proms, BBC Radio 3, BBC Classical TV and the BBC’s Performing Groups as well as a radio producer. Roland was responsible for success such as the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain’s prom which saw over 1000 people play their ukulelies live on BBC Radio (learning resources here). He also introduced initiatives such as ‘Maestro Cam’ and the social music initiative ‘I was there’, connecting event participants to each other and sharing the outreach work of the BBC to a global audience. Roland believes that connecting people physically and digitally is a great thing to do.
  • Jennie Henley currently works as Lecturer in Music Education at the Institute of Education, University of London where she is Programme Leader for the MA in Music Education and Tutor for the Primary PGCE Music Specialism. As a result of working as a coach on a programme giving adult beginners the opportunity to learn to play an instrument within a band, she undertook her PhD research looking at learning ensembles. Her special interest are the social environment of musical learning, the creation and development of musical identities and the practical application of activity theory in music education.
  • Elaine Chew is a recently appointed Professor of Digital Media at Queen Mary University of London.  As a pianist, she gives concert-conversations integrating interactive music technologies in classical performances. As a music science researcher, she is interested in explaining what it is that musicians do when they interpret and perform music, how they do it, and why, using mathematical and computational models, bespoke digital tools, and computer visualisations.  Previously based in the US, she is winner of a Presidential Early Career Award for her efforts integrating research and education at the intersection of music and engineering, and has given keynote talks at music education/theory/cognition conferences. As Director of Music Initiatives at the Centre for Digital Music, she leads from the C4DM side a joint project with the London Chamber Orchestra, LCO New Explore: Inspired by Digital 2012/13, which invites young composers to imagine new ways to integrate new technologies in acoustic compositions.
  • Tim Murray Browne is an artist, coder and researcher based in London. He is currently composer in residence at the Music Hackspace under Sound and Music’s embedded residency programme and working with arts/technology collective Seeper as a creative coder on a range of installations and interactive performances. Murray-Browne’s work explores issues of control, self-expression, development and familiarity and includes IMPOSSIBLE ALONE, a body-reactive sound installation that responds only to synchronised participants, created in collaboration with the dancer Tiff Chan, and the Serendiptichord, a wearable musical instrument for dancers created with Di Mainstone. Earlier this year, he completed his PhD at the Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London, which investigated the roles of exploration, discovery and individual freedom in creating immersive and captivating interactive music installations. His work has been shown around the world at venues including Berkeley Art Museum, the Barbican, the V&A, Kinetica Art Fair, Secret Garden Party, Shunt and INSPACE, Edinburgh.




Week 4 (and 5)

It is a delight to present the first installment of the SAE Institute’s “Sound Advice” series. SAE Atlanta‘s David Lopez instructs how to give your kick drums added distinction and depth in “Sound Advice: EQ Tips & Tricks for Kick Drum pt. I.” The Institute’s tutors are hard at work producing more great content, so do check back!

The last couple of weeks have been busy organising the upcoming Sound School event which will take place at the Google Campus in London. On the 9th November we will gather to share knowledge and skills, enjoy some awesome performances, and exchange ideas on sound education. Maybe you are a great guitarist but don’t know how to make quality recordings of your playing. At this event you could teach someone guitar basics in return for them giving you tips on producing pro recordings. People should come away with a deeper appreciation for sound and potentially long-term connections to other SoundClouders who have knowledge to share.

If you would like to hold a similar event in your community, please get in touch! It would be wonderful to get SoundClouders all over the world to join in the spirit of sharing knowledge and enhancing sound creation.

The line-up and further details will be announced soon.

Join the event on Facebook and stay up to date with developments!  

Week 3

This week the Monterey Jazz Festival got in touch and pointed us towards their astonishing collection of lessons from around 200 Jazz greats like Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Wynton Marsalis and many more. 

The festival’s Digital Music Education Project put the following three questions to each musician:

1) Who were your primary influences? 
2) Which recordings would you recommend to students? 
3) What advice do you have for student musicians?

Each interview is absolutely inspirational, offering deep insight into how jazz legends learned their craft! The advice is not only relevant to students of jazz, but to anyone interested in developing their musical sensibilities.

We also have some great educational content coming from the English National Opera! The following tracks offer examples of musical terms, demonstrated through clips from their productions. Ever wondered what the term 'rubato' means? Thought so! Whilst googling musical terms like a person possessed, you can now listen to them too.

soundcloud:

This week’s Follow the Fellows guest blog post is by Laura Haapio-Kirk whose project, Sound School, is one of the 2012 SoundCloud Community Fellows.
For thousands of years, we have used sound to create rhythms, songs, stories and all kinds of magic. Passed on from person to person, knowledge of how to work with sound has often been limited to having access to the right people. Now that we are so connected online, we are in a better position than ever to learn from each other and from the artists we admire.
Sound School is on its way to becoming a home for educational content on sound, fuelled by the massive skill and talent of the SoundCloud community. For example a professor from Berklee College of Music had the idea to start a set of musical terms explained through sound. Have a listen and upload your own favourite musical term, expressed as creatively as you like!

People are also sharing knowledge on different aspects of sound technology. Help us get this off the ground, so if you have a specific technology tip, please share it and help others out! If you feel like your advice requires screenshots, share a link to them in the timed comments at the relevant moment. Simple!
Sound School is also actively seeking collaboration with educational institutions and are excited to be partnering with the SAE Institute. Their instructors are in the process of recording their “Sound Advice” series which will be a collection of tips and advice based on questions that keep coming up in class. How awesome!
In terms of inspiration, nothing beats hearing from people who are working every day with sound. We want to know things like how you got to where you are now, how you found your style, what goes behind the song writing process, and your biggest lessons so far. The SoundCloud Heroes have given us a wonderful start by sharing their experiences, as you will hear below. Now we need you to share yours!

A new topic we’re working on is ‘Designs for Sound School’. Do you have an idea for how sound education can be improved? A piece of technology that would make a great teaching tool? An opinion on how we should approach sound education? Ideas big and small, we want to hear them all! Those with the best ideas will be invited to come and talk about them at the Sound School event happening in the coming months. This promises to be a wonderful evening where you will get to meet other SoundClouders and share your knowledge and passion for sound in person!
For more ideas on how you can contribute to Sound School, check us out ourTumblr, Facebook, Google+ and follow us on Twitter.

soundcloud:

This week’s Follow the Fellows guest blog post is by Laura Haapio-Kirk whose project, Sound School, is one of the 2012 SoundCloud Community Fellows.

For thousands of years, we have used sound to create rhythms, songs, stories and all kinds of magic. Passed on from person to person, knowledge of how to work with sound has often been limited to having access to the right people. Now that we are so connected online, we are in a better position than ever to learn from each other and from the artists we admire.

Sound School is on its way to becoming a home for educational content on sound, fuelled by the massive skill and talent of the SoundCloud community. For example a professor from Berklee College of Music had the idea to start a set of musical terms explained through sound. Have a listen and upload your own favourite musical term, expressed as creatively as you like!

People are also sharing knowledge on different aspects of sound technology. Help us get this off the ground, so if you have a specific technology tip, please share it and help others out! If you feel like your advice requires screenshots, share a link to them in the timed comments at the relevant moment. Simple!

Sound School is also actively seeking collaboration with educational institutions and are excited to be partnering with the SAE Institute. Their instructors are in the process of recording their “Sound Advice” series which will be a collection of tips and advice based on questions that keep coming up in class. How awesome!

In terms of inspiration, nothing beats hearing from people who are working every day with sound. We want to know things like how you got to where you are now, how you found your style, what goes behind the song writing process, and your biggest lessons so far. The SoundCloud Heroes have given us a wonderful start by sharing their experiences, as you will hear below. Now we need you to share yours!

A new topic we’re working on is ‘Designs for Sound School’. Do you have an idea for how sound education can be improved? A piece of technology that would make a great teaching tool? An opinion on how we should approach sound education? Ideas big and small, we want to hear them all! Those with the best ideas will be invited to come and talk about them at the Sound School event happening in the coming months. This promises to be a wonderful evening where you will get to meet other SoundClouders and share your knowledge and passion for sound in person!

For more ideas on how you can contribute to Sound School, check us out ourTumblrFacebookGoogle+ and follow us on Twitter.

A new topic we’re working on is ‘Designs for Sound School’. Do you have an idea for how sound education can be improved? A piece of technology that would make a great teaching tool? An opinion on how we should approach sound education? Ideas big and small, we want to hear them all! Simply record and upload an explanation of your idea and send it to Sound School via a message or using the Dropbox.

Those with the best ideas will be invited to come and talk about them at the Sound School event happening in the coming months. This promises to be a wonderful evening where you will get to meet other SoundClouders and share your knowledge and passion for sound in person!

For more ideas on how to contribute, read the most recent Sound School update on the SoundCloud blog.

soundcloud:

Jared of One Hello World shares his advice on music-making and composing with Sound School, a 2012 SoundCloud Community Fellow.

If you want to be featured in the Sound School submit your expert tips and tricks, head this way here.

Sound School caught the attention of the Monterey Jazz Festival’s Digital Music Education Project (DMEP). They have shared their incredible recordings of almost 200 artist interviews where they asked each musician the same three questions:

1) Who were your primary influences? 
2) Which recordings would you recommend to students? 
3) What advice do you have for student musicians?

Legendary jazz musicians (Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Wynton Marsalis and many more) have participated and each interview is absolutely inspirational!